Hear Community Points of View

UnderstandTogether: Caregivers

Our long-running Aphasia Threads series was the inspiration for this simple project bringing together people with aphasia, caregivers, and professionals around a question: Why are you a part of the aphasia community, and what do you get out of connecting with others through the NAA?

We shared posts throughout Aphasia Awareness Month weaving together all three viewpoints with a bonus contribution from board members. These thoughts below all come from caregivers/care partners connected to people who have aphasia.

Question: Why are you a part of the aphasia community, and what do you get out of connecting with others through the NAA?

  • For shared community and knowledge. —Elizabeth P.
  • Information and support. —Beth
  • Sharing with others going through the same thing. —Joy B
  • Hoping to help my wife Julie improve with her aphasia. —Michael W.
  • Learning more about PPA. —Dr. Bar
  • Anything I can learn to help my husband or do, I am all on board. —Betty C
  • For answers. —Cris G
  • Learning of others’ experiences, great practical tips, and daily reminders that there IS a strong community of support. Constant encouragement to keep at it and never give up. —Gretchen D.
  • The human connection to others knowing aphasia. When this “happened” upon us, our world was so dark for several months! Scary, confusing moments of who to turn to, how to find the time to research (let alone the energy), hours of fear spent wondering if this was how every stroke warrior and the care partner felt … so many emotions! Then one person – an angel turned us towards the direction of a college program, and suddenly, like a second chance at learning, we began to find our way through aphasia and the unknown support which exists! —Nikki
  • I connect to be a better caretaker for my wife, who seems to be in the early stages of PPA. —Jeremy
  • To hear other people’s stories and progress. —Wandamb
  • Resources and hearing other testimonies. —Lora J
  • As a care partner to my friend of 40 years, whose name is Patricia, who has aphasia after her left brain stroke in 2020 and is now 77 years old. Patricia awes me. Yet most in the world do not understand. —Susan
  • I need to find help for my daughter, who has aphasia after a stroke. —Eileen

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