David, Trazana, and Heather

Aphasia Threads: David, Trazana, and Heather

Welcome to the Aphasia Threads Project, which usually weaves together three points-of-view: people with aphasia, caregivers, and the professionals who help each family navigate aphasia. Each week, we bring together three unrelated stories, one from each member of this triad, to learn from their experience. Yet this week, all three stories come from people with aphasia.

This week, we’ll hear from David, Trazana, and Heather, three people with aphasia.

Aphasia Threads

Person with Aphasia

I am a stroke survivor with aphasia.

Aphasia Changes Your Life

It is difficult making new friends (almost impossible apart from other people with aphasia). The friends that I had before my stroke have vanished.

But There Are Things That Help

I attempt to speak, regardless.

And Things You Learn Along the Way

Aphasia sucks.

What Caregivers and Professionals Can Learn From Me

More apps and CDs.

Aphasia Threads

Person with Aphasia

I had a massive stroke on October 3, 2017.

Trazana

Aphasia Changes Your Life

Aphasia has impacted my life through verbal communication. At times, it is difficult for me to get my words out of my mouth, and it’s hard to say certain words when speaking. I speak slowly and I can’t with respond to things quickly especially when making phone calls to have certain things done. For the people that are close to me, they forget that I have aphasia and misunderstand what I try to say. Then they get frustrated with me because I don’t say the right thing.

But There Are Things That Help

My iPhone and laptop allow me to type words, and speech-to-text allows me to write letters, emails, text messages, and social media posts.

And Things You Learn Along the Way

Slow down when speaking. Sing! Read aloud to do these exercises every day.

What Caregivers and Professionals Can Learn From Me

I don’t have a caregiver. Aphasia is not a mental illness! Don’t treat those who have aphasia as such.

Aphasia Threads

Person with Aphasia

I fell on the ice, landed on the back of my head, and sustained a brain-stem injury. I was diagnosed with a brain-stem injury, aphasia, dysphasia and other diagnoses. I had to re-learn how to do just about everything: Walk, talk, eat, swallow, write, etc.

Heather

Aphasia Changes Your Life

I still do not talk ‘quite right’ and I know the word(s) I want to say, but just can’t grasp them.

But There Are Things That Help

I talk a lot. I read a lot and did I mention I babble on all the time, usually just to hear myself talk!

And Things You Learn Along the Way

Never, ever give up. Continue to learn, use your speech, and attain a better vocabulary.

What Caregivers and Professionals Can Learn From Me

Patience and understanding. I am proud of how far I’ve come, and despite my being ‘not-quite-normal’, I consider myself to be normal as I can be. Everybody has a few quirks — no-one is perfect.

Aphasia Threads

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Aphasia Threads is an on-going project created by the National Aphasia Association. If you’d like to be featured, don’t leave a comment. Instead, please read the opening post for more information or fill out our form and we’ll contact you.

Comments

One Comment

  • Anonymous
    February 21, 2020 at 9:34 am

    im going to pratice thank you

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