The Legacy of Shirley Morganstein

Shirley Morganstein | January 28, 2018

The aphasia world lost a true champion when Shirley Morganstein passed away after a bout with cancer. Shirley was a long-standing member of the Professional Advisory Board of the NAA, and we are grateful for the wisdom and advocacy she brought to our organization. Shirley devoted her career to improving the quality of life for families experiencing aphasia. She was a protégé of our founder, Martha Taylor Sarno, who stated that “few speech-language pathologists have understood the insider perspective of living with aphasia as well as Shirley. Her career has been characterized by a passion for bringing meaningfulness to persons with aphasia. She is a gift.” Marilyn Certner-Smith, Shirley’s partner in co-founding “Speaking of Aphasia,” a private practice dedicated to aphasia states that “she was keenly sensitive to the needs of others, how to support people, and write authentically about the importance of relationships. Her family and friends adored her, her clients flourished and her colleagues revered her.” We honor her as a pioneer, a champion for the rights of people with disabilities, a generous colleague, and a trusted friend.

Honoring Her Legacy

Please consider making a donation to the National Aphasia Association in Shirley’s honor, or share thoughtful remarks in the comments.

 

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Comments

One Comment

  • Grace Carpenter
    August 28, 2019 at 8:49 am

    I never met Shirley, and I am so sad I wasn’t able meet her.

    I had a stroke in 2010, and I was fairly disabled by aphasia for many years. I spent a fair amount of time browsing the web every day, hoping to find answers to all the questions I had about aphasia, and also looking for any kind of support or inspiration. Shirley’s blog (https://reflectioninaphasia.wordpress.com) spoke to me, because she understood aphasia at a deep and also spiritual level, and how it can rip up identity in an instant. But I also was sure that she had a good sense of humor!

    Rest in peace, Shirley. You helped so many people, including people who never met you,

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